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New Novel First Draft Complete…

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Since “Sherlock Holmes and the Body Snatchers” came out last March, I’ve been diligently working on the last installment of the Whitechapel Vampire Trilogy, as yet unnamed, and have at last completed a rough first draft.

A few editorial notes about the trilogy. The first book, “Sherlock Holmes and the Whitechapel Vampire” was written entirely in third person point of view (POV) and I took my fair share of criticism for that as it was not in the Watson first person POV of most of the canon. That didn’t bother, though, as the original concept for the book wasn’t a Sherlock Holmes story, but was conceived as ‘what if Jack the Ripper were really a vampire’. Because of the time period involved, I worked Sherlock Holmes into the story, at first as an ancillary character. But I enjoyed writing the Holmes parts so much, I beefed up his role, which caused me to consider first person, but thought I’d wait.

The second book, ‘Body Snatchers’ was written in first person POV, but from varying characters. I thought it served the story and I was hesitant to attempt a full pastiche by having Watson’s POV be the only one in the book.

But now, in the third and final installment I’ve decided to go all out and write it as Doyle might have. The final book of the trilogy follows Watson throughout and will, I hope, give the reader more than a few surprises along the way. This final book takes place many years after the first two, which took place in 1888, first in London, and then New York. The action in the third takes place again in New York but in the year 1913, long after Holmes has retired to beekeeping in Sussex.

So, this trilogy has several arcs for the reader to follow. The story arc spans some twenty-five years, from 1888 to 1913, and each character in the story, I think, has his or her own arc of change. Finally, the writing itself has an arc from third person POV to multiple first person POV and finally to the first person POV used most often by Doyle, that of Watson. My hope is that aficionados of writing and of Sherlock Holmes will take note and enjoy the varied styles and mostly will enjoy the story from beginning to end.

Booksigning at Newport News, Virginia…

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March 26th book signing for Best Editorial Cartoons of the Year was less than a rousing success…the total number of books sold was zero…

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The signing took place at the Barnes and Noble at 12170 Jefferson Ave, Newport News, VA 23602. The store was very nice and Diana, who was the manager on duty, was very nice and asked me to sign two copies for the store at the end of the night.  The only success of the night was that I was able to give away a ton of bookmarks to the patrons who walked by.

Being from San Diego (at least for the last few years), I was not used to the cold weather or the snow. I was actually snowed on for the first time in over thirty years.

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Car

 

The bright spot of the evening was that I gave away a ton of bookmarks for my novels.

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On the return trip home, in the airports, I was able to place my bookmarks in the airport bookstores. Hopefully they will reach a wide audience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My mindmap…

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I thought that since I mentioned using mindmapping in my last post, I should follow up with a picture of my mindmap for the third in my Whitechapel Vampire series, which is yet untitled by is “Sherlock Holmes and a Vampire’s Lament”…

DSCN1234Also, I’m trying to have a couple of my short stories published in a magazine (The Fog, and The Ninth Baron of Wexley). If anyone has tips for short story publication, please leave a comment.

 

Writing with mind-mapping…

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I’m starting the third book in my Whitechapel Vampire trilogy (as yet still unnamed) and am using a new technique to aid in putting it all together. The technique is called mind-mapping

and allows me to list in a graphical format relationships, characteristics, plot points, conflicts, etc.

You can find a good article here.

Re-start…new novel is coming along…

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It’s been awhile since I’ve posted anything. I could say I’ve been terribly busy writing (which is true), and my laborious day job has been keeping me extremely busy (also true), but the real truth is I’ve been lax and lazy with this blog.

I am, however, nearing the end of the writing cycle for my sequel to Sherlock Holmes and the WHitechapel Vampire, tentatively titled (though it changes month to month) SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE BODY SNATCHERS, Whitechapel Vampire Book II.

As part of my research for this book, which is written more in the style of the original canon, though not exactly, I’ve begun re-reading the canon, back to front, so to speak. I’m using the William S. Baring-Gould chrnonology to begin reading the stories that supposedly occurred last, first. Anyone who’s read the short stories is familiar with the way they seem to jump around in time, so I resorted to an authority on the canon. I’m also posting a page here that has the entire chronology listed, as compiled by James Hoy. Hoy used four letter abbreviations for the works, and I include those, with the actual titles and I’ve included which collection of stories they can be found.

So, please avail yourself to the Baring-Gould Chrnonology of Arthur Conan Doyle’s stories about SHERLOCK HOLMES.

First Agent turndown…

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I’ve received my first rejection by an agent for my new novel, ABIGAIL DRAKE (Death of the Whitechapel Vampire). Molly Friedrich turned me down flat. That’s too bad for me. She at least read and had some nice things to say about my first novel, SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE WHITECHAPEL VAMPIRE.

Hopefully, I will have better luck as time goes on. I’ve queried three other agents. If anyone has experience in this and has some pointers for me, I’d appreciate it. My novel was not represented, but got published anyway. But since Sherlock Holmes isn’t in the new novel, they wouldn’t be interested in the sequel.

Ideas for the sequel…

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Although I’ve written the draft for the sequel to

Sherlock Holmes and the Whitechapel Vampire

I thought it would be fun to solicit ideas for what the reader would like to see in it. If you should happen by this blog, do stop a moment and comment…particularly if you’ve read my first novel.

Sherlock Holmes and the Whitechapel Vampire on audio…

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I’ve just learned that my book, Sherlock Holmes and the Whitechapel Vampire, is now available as an audiobook.

My publisher, MX Publishing, surprised me with an email yesterday, but I only saw it tonight. I was ecstatic as I have a friend who is blind and I’ve been toying with the idea of recording the book myself, but I don’t have the right equipment to make a really good recording. Now I don’t have to.

Thanks MX Publishing, and especially Steve Emecz, for making this happen!

Twitter – Socialist network, or anti-social?

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First, let me say I’m soliciting comments from anyone who might have insight to my character’s problem.

Okay, that may be a bit strong, but one of my characters, Baron Barlucci, has a Twitter account and when he arose from his crypt last found it had been suspended. His crime? Sending “unsolicited” tweets to other twitter accounts. Now you may ask if they were improper, indecent, or just too many of them over and over. I’ve only his word to say no to each of these, but he’s never lied to me before.

It seems recently, in an effort to aid me in my attempt to discover what agents are reading what, he has recently followed several agents, editors and the like. My suspicion is that one of these New York business folk got their ire up at being contacted by a mere character. The baron usually replies with a witty remark on a tweet someone else has posted.

My question is, if the person (and I use that term loosely) who may have found some offense at being ‘tweeted’ on Twitter, why didn’t they simply tweet back a “please don’t tweet me” message. My guess is that they knew how that would look, a word rhyming with ‘itchy’, and thought it would be easier to poison the Baron’s Twitter experience by anonymously. My guess is that they use this spam rule: “If you send large numbers of unsolicited @replies or mentions in an attempt to spam a service or link”. Though he occasionally reference my book and my blog, he does it sparingly so and hey, isn’t the ‘network’ part of social networking?

My belief is that a single user felt they were just too important to be bothered by a fiction character and complained. Now, the baron is contemplating chucking his account.

YOU COMMENTS WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED!

A Lesson in Deduction…

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If you can filter out the British accent (pardon me, Steve), this is a delightfully illuminating talk with much that is of practical use…please enjoy and share with your friends…

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