Home

GOODREADS Giveaway is over!

Leave a comment

Thanks to everyone who entered the Goodreads Giveaway for my latest novel, “Sherlock Holmes and the Return of the Whitechapel Vampire”. Over 2100 people entered and I will be mailing out the winners’ autographed copies tomorrow.

Congratulations SAMANTHA and MARIE!! Don’t forget to write a review as soon as you have read the books!

The invitation goes for anyone who has read my work to review it — either on Goodreads or on Amazon and/or Barnes & Noble.

What’s that comma for?

Leave a comment

Although I’m not certain what the source was, I created this handy-dandy little checklist for comma usage early on in my writing career. I still use it from time to time, although more a gentle reminder than as a check_list. I hope you will find it useful too.

Comma usage blog

As an aid in using this checklist, I’m also including definitions of some of the terms used above. No offense implied should you already be familiar.

Restrictive and non-restrictive clauses: An adjective clause is restrictive when it limits the thing it refers to and is therefore essential to the sentence. Example: The store accepted returns that were less than sixty days old. If an adjective clause adds non-essential or extra information it is non-restrictive and should use a comma followed by which to introduce it. Example: Julia’s scarf, which was purchased three months ago, was not accepted as a return.

Introductory dependent clause: A group of words including a verb and a subject but does not express a complete thought and cannot stand alone, which introduces a sentence. Example: When I worry, I eat.

Example of non-restrictive clause in the middle of a sentence: The book, which was on the table, was on fire.

Appositive: A noun or noun phrase that renames another noun right beside it. Example: His hat, a billycock, was askew. His girlfriend, a short girl with flaming red hair, sat down beside him.

Parentheticals: A parenthetical is a statement or reference that is incidental and could be properly enclosed within parentheses (hence the name). Example: Parentheticals, for example, require commas.

Transitionals: Words and phrases used to connect one idea with the next. Example: The fingertips contain numerous nerve endings. To illustrate, pick up that branding iron.

Conjunction: A word used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause. Example: In his pocket he had a coin, a ring, and a piece of twine.

Independent clause: A clause (group of words consisting of at least a noun and a verb) that can stand alone as a simple sentence. Example: His car started smoothly and he took off for home.

WHODUNIT?: THE UNIVERSE IS DYING (SPOILER ALERT: DARK MATTER)

Leave a comment

Recently I read an article saying scientists last year published data that the universe is dying. Don’t panic, apparently it’s been dying for the last 10 billion years and will continue to die for trillions more. So this isn’t the news that grabbed my attention.

DarkMatterMap

What I found more fascinating than a dying universe was the postulation that dark energy was causing the expansion of this dying universe to speed up. And that dark matter is a substance that keeps our own galaxy from flying apart. These ideas seem to me to be counter-intuitive, but then they were predicted by no less an Einstein than Einstein, so who am I to doubt?
Anyway, this got me thinking about how in almost every culture, every genre, every folk tale, darkness is equated with evil. And then to find out that dark energy is speeding up the demise of the universe is to me, quite shocking and a bit revelatory. I mean, it tends to imply that we have an innate sense of the universe and the place of darkness within it. So, rather than saying that evil is negative energy, perhaps it’s more accurate to say that evil is possessed of dark energy.

dracula_ap_328Darth-Vader_6bda9114Frankenstein-article1

This gives thought perhaps to having an evil genius or race of aliens who use dark energy in ways we use (should we call it) light energy, with the theme of Good vs Evil becoming an actual battle between darkness and light for the very life of the universe.

It was just a thought.

A story a week…

Leave a comment

I’ve decided to shake the dust off some old stories and pieces of stories I’ve written and give them a fresh airing. What I hope to get out of this are useful comments, whether complimentary or not, that I can use to get better at the craft of writing. Feel free to critique and to criticize what you see here. I’ll begin with something I wrote a couple of years ago and put up on Amazon’s, and Barnes and Noble’s self-publishing platform. So this one is a complete work, though I’ve not touched it in quite some time.

banshee

 

THE BANSHEE OF THE RANNOCH MOOR

by Dean P. Turnbloom

 

I believe it was the Bard himself who wrote, “there are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy,” and I am here to tell you it’s a fact. The story I’m about to tell is true, I swear it by all that is holy, and all that is unholy for that matter, for this isn’t a tale for the faint of heart. Be warned, for if you hear the cry of the Banshee…but wait, I’m getting ahead of myself.

 Here, sit down, let me start from the beginning, so you can judge for yourself. I may not tell it well, but then who’s to say what’s worth the telling, eh? Sit. It’ll only take a little while. There, that’s better.

More